#7: Gas-s-s-s!

#7: Gas-s-s-s! I don't do well with empathy. I found Punishment Parkan upsetting viewing experience for many reasons, not the least of which being its ability to force an emotional connection between myself and hippie culture. For a man with Cartmanian opinions…

Read more...

#6: On the Beach

#6: On the Beach When I moved to Los Angeles, the hills were alive with the sound of inferno. Forest fires raged, and consumed subdivisions whole. Smoke covered the smog that covered the city, and on several occasions, my friends from the Valley evacuated and crashed with me. Darkness never blotted out our sky, but if the wind hit just right, you could smell the embers. One morning my car was covered in soot — a surreal image I'll never shake. In an op-ed piece which ran at the time, a coastal contrast was highlighted. New Yorkers had to deal with 9/11, taxi drivers, extreme weather, and other New Yorkers on public transit. Los Angeles was jealous of this threatening lifestyle, but overcompensated. Our people proved we could hang by fully embracing the Apocalypse, in whatever form it took that week. Californians never ran from their own burning homes, but stood out front in sunglasses, gin and tonic in hand, smiling and humming "Light My Fire" as the flames took control.…

Read more...

#5: In the Mouth of the Madness

#5: In the Mouth of the Madness "A reality is just what we tell each other it is." I hate lovingLovecraft. While H.P. is responsible for modern horror as we know it, I must respect and loathe him in equal measure. Firmly rooted in the idea of cosmicism, he believed the universe was too gigantic to care about humanity, much less be understood by us. Hence, his work operates around the central device of terror too incomprehensible to be committed to words. Each monster "indescribable," the ever-present dread "unknowable," the crushing weight of universal truth "unrepeatable." At points, his characters are even to frightened to describe architecture. Architecture. It all reeks of a cheap trick to lazily avoid definitions. Such a hack move, he'd be laughed out of any writing workshop.…

Read more...

#4: Masters of Horror

#4: Masters of Horror There's that project you discuss with friends, probably over beers, that never comes to fruition. An idea you all love, believe in, and promise to dedicate time towards. Then, when the buzz wears off, or responsibility returns, it falls by the wayside — to be rekindled at the next gathering, and embarrassingly discarded repeatedly. Knowing this experience well, I curse my social circles from some pit of bitter jealousy deep within, for depriving me a Mick Garris.…

Read more...

#3: The Divide

#3: The Divide Jean-Paul Satre said "Hell is other people," but in the post-apocalyptic world, his statement becomes a question. End-of-the-world fiction is often built on the assumption that humanity is responsible for its own demise: we made our bed and now we must sleep in it, while it incinerates around us. But in the aftermath, where does one seek comfort? There is safety in numbers, and the re-birth of civilization is not a private endeavor. If our end product turned out to be self-annihilation, why rebuild that machine with the same parts? Director Xavier Gens makes a case for abandoning humanity with The Divide (2012), a film that re-invents the genre as a terrifying time-lapse history of our existence.…

Read more...

×
Sign up for our newsletter!
  • Screenwriting tips to guide you through your writing
  • Industry news and movie reviews
  • Important updates on screenwriting functions and events
  • Get TSL's Encyclopedia of Screenwriting e-book FREE
×

Wait! We've got a secret.

 

Sign up for our newsletter and we'll send you TWO of our e-books, completely free:

220 Plot Point Breakdowns (new!)

AND

TSL's Encyclopedia of Screenwriting